Lighthouses

Lighthouse Directory

Maine is known as “The Lighthouse State” for good reasons. By the turn of the 20th century, at least 70 lighthouses guarded its craggy seacoast, its deepest rivers and even one lake. A mariner could sail up and down the coast and always have a lighthouse in sight. Sixty-seven of these beacons still stand. There are more lighthouses here than in any other states but Michigan and New York, and more coastal lighthouses than anywhere in the nation.


Nash Island Light
Addison
Nash Island Light was established in 1838 to mark the entrance to the prime lobstering territory in Pleasant Bay. Over the years, the station was improved and expanded. But today, little remains but a square stone tower, which was deactivated. It is being restored by Friends of Nash Island Light. The island is managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as a wildlife refuge and is not open to the public.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Squirrel Point Light Station
Arrowsic
Squirrel Point Light Station was established in 1898 and includes a small, octagonal, shingled tower, a shingled fog bell house with a gable roof, and a two-story keeper's dwelling. Squirrel Point’s grounds are open to the public, and accessible via a two-thirds-of-a-mile trail through woods and marsh at the dead end of Bald Head Road in Arrowsic. It also can be seen from Route 209 in Phippsburg, just across the river.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Kennebec River (Doubling Point) Range Lights
Arrowsic Island
The Kennebec River, or Doubling Point, Range Lights were built in 1898. This station consists of two white, wooden octagonal towers containing special "range" reflector lights, along with a clapboard keeper's house. The two towers stand just 13 and 21 feet high respectively and are connected by a wooden walkway. Mariners heading north on the Kennebec use the two beacons to help them line up their ships before making a potentially treacherous turn.

(207) 442-7443
fogdog@rlk.org

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Bass Harbor Head Light
Bass Harbor
Built in 1858, the Bass Harbor Head is one of the most frequently photographed Maine lights. It sits atop a rugged, pink rock cliff surrounded by dark evergreens. Located on the southern end of Mt. Desert Island, it's a cylindrical tower attached to the keeper's house by a short, enclosed passageway. You can visit the grounds year-round—but a Coast Guard family lives in the keeper's house and asks that their privacy be respected. You can view the light from the end of Lighthouse Road in Bass Harbor or by cruise or plane.

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Wood Island Light Station
Biddeford
The first Wood Island Light was established in 1808, but the station was rebuilt several times during its long history. The station sits on a small, lonely island off the mouth of the Saco River. The lighthouse is owned by the Coast Guard but is leased to Friends of Wood Island Lighthouse, a chapter of the American Lighthouse Foundation.

(207) 594-4174
info@lighthousefoundation.org

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Burnt Island Light Station
Boothbay Harbor
Burnt Island Light Station was built in 1821. Located at the west entrance to Boothbay Harbor, this lighthouse is now run by Maine's Department of Marine Resources as an educational center. From July to September, Monday to Friday, the center offers programs in navigation and maritime history, natural history, art, literature and more. Boat trips take passengers between the island and the mainland. The light can also be seen from Grand View Road on Linekin Neck in Boothbay Harbor.

(207) 633-9559
elaine.jones@maine.gov

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Ram Island Light Station
Boothbay Harbor
Ram Island Light Station was established in 1883. Ram Island is a popular name in Maine, which has 21 different Ram Islands. This one, in Boothbay Harbor, was once used to quarantine rams to control sheep breeding. The light marks a passage into Boothbay Harbor and includes a keeper's house, although it is some distance inland. The light is not open to the public, although the grounds can be visited by appointment. The light can be seen from Ocean Point at the end of Route 96 on Linekin Neck in Boothbay Harbor. It also can be viewed from various cruises.

(207) 633-4727
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Pemaquid Point Lighthouse
Bristol
The Pemaquid Point Lighthouse Park is located at the entrance to Muscongus Bay and Johns Bay, in the town of Bristol. The Town of Bristol purchased the park property from the Coast Guard in 1940 with the exception of the light tower. Pemaquid Point Lighthouse Park is managed by the Bristol Parks Commission. It is the lighthouse on the Maine State Quarter, making it the first lighthouse to be featured on a piece of US currency.

(207) 594-4174
info@lighthousefoundation.org

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Blue Hill Bay Lighthouse
Brooklin
Also known as Eggemoggin Light, this beacon guided mariners into Eggemoggin Reach and Blue Hill Bay, a busy lumbering port in the 19th century. The light is now privately owned. It can be seen by boat or from Naskeag Road in Brooklin. Blue Hill Bay Lighthouse was built in 1857.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Whitlocks Mill Light Station
Calais
Whitlock's Mill Light Station was established on a bend on the St. Croix River in 1892. It is Maine's northernmost light station. The original light station didn't have a tower. Instead, a local mill owner simply took a red lantern to the south bank of the river and hung the lantern from a tree. In 1910, a convention light tower was built. The light was automated in 1969 and still functions as a navigational aid. The keeper's house is privately owned and not open to the public. The light tower is owned by the St. Croix Historical Society. You can see it from a dirt road near the Taylor Furniture store on Route 1, just south of Calais.

(207) 454-3061

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Curtis Island Lighthouse
Camden
Curtis Island Lighthouse was built in 1836, on the southeast end of Curtis Island. The light overlooks Camden Harbor. The lighthouse and grounds are owned by the Town of Camden and are only accessible by boat. The grounds are open to the public.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Cape Elizabeth Lights (“Two Lights”)
Cape Elizabeth
For many years, beginning in 1828, the station included two light towers - one with a fixed beam, the other flashing. These helped mariners establish their positions. The west tower was discontinued in 1924, when officials decided it was redundant. Today, it is privately owned. The east tower, now automated, still serves as a navigational aid. The east tower and immediate grounds are not open to the public. Two Lights State Park, nearby off route 77, is named in honor of this station.

(207) 594-4174
info@lighthousefoundation.org

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Portland Head Light
Cape Elizabeth
Portland Head Light was first lit on Jan. 10, 1791.This light has a white conical tower, a charming Victorian keeper's house with a rambling red roof and eyebrow eves on the porch, a commanding setting at the southwest entrance to Portland harbor, and beautifully landscaped grounds. Commissioned by George Washington and dedicated by the Marquis de Lafayette, it is the state's oldest lighthouse and one of its most beloved. The Museum at Portland Head Light is in the former Keepers' Quarters. The light is now automated. The lighthouse and the adjacent Fort Williams Park are owned by the town of Cape Elizabeth.

(207) 799-2661
cephl@aol.com

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Ram Island Ledge Light
Cape Elizabeth
This cylindrical, granite light, was built in 1905 to mark a jagged rock pile near the northern entrance to Portland's harbor that caused many shipwrecks before the cylindrical, granite light was erected. The light is now privately owned, but you can see it by boat or from Fort Williams State Park off Shore Road in Cape Elizabeth.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Goat Island Light Station
Cape Porpoise
The Goat Island Light Station was designed to help mariners find their way to sheltered Cape Porpoise Harbor. Built in 1833, this light station was one of the last to be automated. Secret service agents protecting President George H.W. Bush found it a convenient spot to watch over the Bush compound at Walker's Point. The light station is leased to the Kennebunk Conservation Trust, which is restoring it. You can view this light from the mainland at the Cape Porpoise Pier.

(207) 967-3465
info@kctoffice.org

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Dice Head Light
Castine
Dice (or Dyce) Head Light was built in 1828. Located at the north side of the entrance to Castine Harbor, this modest, domestic-looking light was damaged and rebuilt several times until it finally was sold in the 1930s. It is owned by the Town of Castine, which restored the original structure. The lighthouse is closed to the public, but grounds are open daily at the west end of Battle Avenue in Castine. Limited parking is available.

(207) 326-4502

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Petit Manan Light Station
Corea
Petit Manan Light Station was established in 1817. The current tower, locally known as 'tit Manan, is one of the state's tallest lighthouses, rising 123 feet. The granite block tower seems to bear no relation to the charmless keeper's house and outbuildings. The light is closed to the public and managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as part of the Petit Manan National Wildlife Refuge. It can be seen from Petit Manan Point in Milbridge, reached by a two-mile hike along Shore Trail.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Little River Lighthouse
Cutler
The Little River Lighthouse was established in 1847 on a small island just off shore of Cutler. The lighthouse is not visible from shore. The first tower, of granite and stone, was torn down and replaced in 1876. That tower, made of bricks encased in steel, still stands. In 1888, a two-story wooden Victorian keeper's house was built as part of the station. It, too, remains. The light station was automated in the mid-1970s and largely abandoned. But the light station was rescued and restored.

(207) 594-4174
info@lighthousefoundation.org

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Eagle Island Light
Deer Isle
Built in 1839 and now owned by Eagle Light Caretakers. The grounds are open but the tower is closed. Can be viewed from shore at the end of Dunham Point Road, by boat with Guided Island Tours or by air with Penobscot Island Air.

(207) 348-6124
deerisle@deerisle.com

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Great Duck Island Light Station
Frenchboro
Great Duck Island Light Station was built in 1890 on a remote, 220-acre offshore island. It is best viewed by boat. The island is shared by the College of the Atlantic, The Nature Conservancy, the State of Maine, and a private summer resident. The college oversees the light station, which includes the old Head Keeper's House, two boathouses, and the actual lighthouse. The island hosts research on birds and sustainable energy. The island is closed to the public from April through October in order to protect breeding populations of seabirds and raptors.

(207) 288-5015
info@lighthousefoundation.org

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Mount Desert Rock Light
Frenchboro
Mount Desert Rock Lighthouse was established in 1830, about 20 miles southeast of Mount Desert Island. This is one of Maine's most remote lights. Even mild storms scour the island and frequently submerge it entirely. It's a challenge to see this lighthouse, even from a boat, but whale-watching cruises from Bar Harbor sometimes pass by.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Franklin Island Light
Friendship
This light station, on the northwest side of Franklin Island, was created in 1807 to mark the entrance to Muscongus Bay. After being rebuilt several times, the light was automated in 1967 and the keeper's house and other outbuildings were demolished. A white conical brick light tower remains. It can be viewed by boat or seen faintly from the Rachel Carson Salt Pond Preserve on Route 32 in New Harbor.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Perkins Island Light Station
Georgetown
This octagonal wooden Perkins Island Light Station, with its pyramidal fog bell tower, helped mariners to navigate the Kennebec River. Built in 1898. it was automated in 1959 and fell into disrepair. Friends of Perkins Lighthouse are working to restore the property. You can see the light from Parker Head Road in Phippsburg or via a cruise.

(207) 594-4174
info@lighthousefoundation.org

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Pond Island Light Station
Georgetown
Pond Island Light Station was established in 1821 on an island marking the entrance to the Kennebec River. The island is managed as a bird refuge by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The light can be seen from Popham Beach.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Seguin Island Light Station
Georgetown
Seguin Island Light Station was established in 1795on a small island about 2 miles from the mouth of the Kennebec River. The large, powerful light, standing 180 feet above the water, contrasts strikingly with the modest, red-brick keeper's quarters. This was Maine's first offshore station. The light can be seen from Popham Beach. Connie Scovill Small lived here and wrote about it in a memoir, "The Lighthouse Keeper's Life."

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Crabtree Ledge Lighthouse
Hancock
This caisson-style, "spark-plug" light once stood in Frenchman Bay, near Hancock Point. It was sold to a series of private owners and was so poorly maintained that it eventually collapsed. It no longer exists. Crabtree Ledge Lighthouse was built in 1890.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Halfway Rock Light
Harpswell
Halfway Rock Light was built in 1871 atop a small, notorious rock heap that caused many shipwrecks. The conical granite tower, technically located in Harpswell, can be seen from the Portland Observatory on Congress Street or from the end of Route 24 on Bailey Island, where a small parking area welcomes visitors. Several cruises also pass nearby.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Isle au Haut (Robinson Point) Light
Isle au Haut
Built in 1907, the Robinson Point Lighthouse Station is a 48-foot brick tower at the sea's edge. It is connected by a wooden walkway that extends slightly inland to the keeper's house, which is now an inn. You can stay at the main house or at one of the inn's separate cottages. Frommers has rated the inn as one of the world's "10 Untouched Island Escapes," as the island is off the power grid. You can also view the light by boat with Guided Island Tours, Isle au Haut Ferry Service, Old Quarry Ocean Adventures and by air with Penobscot Island Air.

(207) 335-2990

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Grindle Point Light
Islesboro
Grindle Point Light was established in 1851 on the offshore island of Islesboro. The light overlooks—and guides mariners into—Gilkey Harbor. The station features a square brick tower. You can take a ferry from the Maine State Ferry System to the island from the mainland town of Lincolnville. The station sits at the town ferry landing. In July and August, you can visit the Sailor's Museum inside the keeper's house.

(207) 734-2253
manager@townofislesboro.com

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Baker Island Lighthouse
Islesford
Located on one of the outermost Cranberry Isles, this light marked the approach to Mt. Desert Island and guided vessels into Frenchman's Bay. It was automated in 1966 and became one of the nation's few solar-powered light stations. But it was deactivated in 2002 because surrounding trees blocked a good view of the light. There's no place to see this well from the mainland, but boat tours are available. Baker Island Lighthouse was built in 1828.
207-288-3338

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Moose Peak Light
Jonesport
Moose Peak Lighthouse was established in 1827 on small, barren Mistake Island. The white, conical tower rises 57 feet. It is not open to the public, but you can cruise nearby.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Whaleback Ledge Light Station
Kittery
The Whaleback Ledge Light Station guards the entrance to Portsmouth Harbor and its name matches its appearance—it looks like a lighthouse perched on the back of a whale. It is closed to the public but you can see it from Fort Foster in Kittery and from the water. The original light station was built in 1829.

(207) 594-4174
info@lighthousefoundation.org

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Pumpkin Island Lighthouse
Little Deer Isle
The Pumpkin Island Light was established in 1854 to mark Eggemoggin Reach. The station was automated in 1934 and sold. It is now a private home and not open to the public. But can be seen from the shores of Little Deer Isle.

(207) 348-2455
deerisle@deerisle.com

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Lubec Channel Light
Lubec
The Lubec Channel Light, built in 1890, is a cast iron, "spark plug-style" lighthouse. It sits, surrounded by water, in the Lubec Narrows. The treacherous seaway separates Maine from Canada's Campobello Island and was heavily trafficked by boats bound for Lubec's sardine factories.

(207) 733-2180
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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West Quoddy Head Light
Lubec
The West Quoddy Head Light station was established in 1808 and became the easternmost lighthouse in the United States. The station was rebuilt in 1831 and again in 1858. Its tower sports distinctive red and white horizontal stripes. That tower is closed to the public. But you can explore the lighthouse grounds and enjoy the Visitor Center Museum, located inside the 1858 Light Keepers' house adjacent to the lighthouse.

(207) 941-4014
bpl@maine,gov

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Avery Rock Lighthouse
Machias
Avery Rock is an immense granite boulder, spanning about a quarter of an acre, that rises out of the sea at the south end of Machias Bay. To save space on this barren rock, the light station was built directly on top of the keeper's house. Unfortunately, nothing of the light station remains. It was all demolished by a fierce storm in 1946. Avery Rock Lighthouse was built in 1875.
207-594-3301

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Libby Island Light Station
Machiasport
This station, which marks the entrance to Machias Bay, was established in 1822 and rebuilt and refurbished several times afterwards. Philmore Wass, raised here when his father was the keeper, wrote a memoir of that time, 'Lighthouse in My Life.' The light was automated in 1974 and is closed to the public. The keeper's house and other outbuildings are gone. Charter and excursion boats offer water views of the tower.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Matinicus Rock Light Station
Matinicus
Fives miles east of Matinicus Island, this remote station was established in 1827. It sits on a 32-acre, windswept rock. Access to the island is limited, but the light can be seen via boat cruise.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Narraguagus (Pond Island) Light Station
Milbridge
Narraguagus Light Station was built in 1853 and discontinued in 1934. The light, which marks the western entrance to Narraguagus Bay, is privately owned and not open to the public. You can best view it by boat. The white, round stone light sits on a rocky ledge on Pond Island that once housed an inn and a golf course.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Monhegan Light
Monhegan
This gray, granite light serves Monhegan Island, known for its art and traditional fishing communities. Located about 10 miles from the mainland, the light was built at the island's highest point near its center and rises 47 feet up. The station includes the Manana Foghorn. The keeper's house is a museum dedicated to Monhegan history. You can visit daily from June 24 to Sept. 30.

(207) 596-7003

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Goose Rocks Lighthouse
North Haven
A killer ledge lies just below the surface of the water in the Fox Islands Thoroughfare that passes between North Haven and Vinalhaven. This "spark plug-style" light marks the spot, warning mariners to beware. It's now automated and solar-powered, but it still serves the same function. Goose Rocks Lighthouse was built in 1890.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Bear Island Lighthouse
Northeast Harbor
Located at the entrance to Somes Sound, this lighthouse is part of Acadia National Park but not open to the public. It's leased to private residents who keep up the property. The keeper's house is a large, gambrel-roofed dwelling that looks like a fancy French barn with baby blue trim. Some photographers call it a favorite. The light is visible from the mainland along Shore Road in Manset, but the best views are from the water. The Cranberry Isles mailboat passes Bear Island daily, year-round, and other cruises and air tours are available. Bear Island Lighthouse was built in 1839.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Owls Head Lighthouse
Owls Head
Owls Head Light, built in 1825, includes a short, brick light tower that sits atop a steep rise near Rockland Harbor. The keeper's house is down a set of stairs from the light. A Coast Guard family uses the house, but you can visit the station at Owls Head State Park.

(207) 594-4174
info@lighthousefoundation.org

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Marshall Point Light Station
Port Clyde
Marshall Point Light Station was built in 1832. A dramatic wooden arm connects the keeper's house to this round, black and white lighthouse. It's a photographers' favorite in a town known as an artists' retreat. The former kitchen now houses a museum with artifacts from this light, as well as the Whitehead, Tenants Harbor and St. George lights. Thomas and Lee Szelog, who were tenants in the renovated lighthouse from 1989-2003, described their experiences in "Our Point of View: Fourteen Years at a Maine Lighthouse." To reach the light, follow route 131 south to Port Clyde, then go left on Drift Inn Road and right on Marshall Point Rd, which ends at the light.

(207) 372-6450

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Prospect Harbor Point Light
Prospect Harbor
Prospect Harbor Point Light was established in 1850. The original granite lighthouse was replaced by a 38-foot tall wooden lighthouse in 1891. The white cylindrical lighthouse with a black lantern top nicely matches the keeper's house, a classic New England clapboard home with black trim. The U.S. Navy owns and uses the former lightkeeper’s dwelling and outbuildings – all except for the light tower, which is owned by the U.S. Coast Guard and licensed to the American Lighthouse Foundation. You can drive to the entrance of the Navy installation for a good view.

(207) 594-4174
info@lighthousefoundation.org

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Rockland Breakwater Light
Rockland
Rockland Breakwater Light was built in 1888 at the end of a half-mile granite breakwater. From a distance, the station looks like a house drifting out to sea, with a small beacon attached. The lighthouse is open for tours on summer weekends. It can be reached by turning onto Waldo Ave. from Route 1, then turning right on Samoset Road. The road ends at a small parking area. The Breakwater, to the left of the parking area, leads about .8 miles to the lighthouse.

(207) 594-4174
info@lighthousefoundation.org

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Indian Island Light Station
Rockport
Indian Island Light Station was established in 1850 at the entrance to Rockport Harbor. It's a square brick tower attached to a T-shaped keeper's house. The station was closed in 1934 and replaced by an automated beacon on nearby Lowell Rock. The Indian Island lighthouse is privately owned and not open to the public. But it can be seen from aboard excursion boats that launch from nearby harbors.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Portland Breakwater Light (“Bug Light”)
South Portland
Built in 1875, "BUG LIGHT" is one of Maine's most elegant lighthouses. Though modeled on an ancient Greek monument, the 26-foot-tall tower is built of plates of cast iron. It was dubbed "Bug Light" due to its small size. The light sits in Bug Light Park in South Portland, where free parking is available. To reach the park, take Route 77 south into South Portland. Drive east on Broadway, turn left on Pickett St., which becomes Madison St. and leads to the park. Bug Light can also be seen from several Casco Bay cruises.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Spring Point Ledge Light
South Portland
Spring Point Ledge Light was built in 1898 to warn mariners of a dangerous ledge in Portland Harbor. The light resembles a giant spark plug and sits at the end of a granite breakwater connected to the campus of Southern Maine Community College in South Portland. The lighthouse is owned by the Spring Point Ledge Light Trust and is open to the public on certain weekend days from June through September. To visit Spring Point Ledge Light, head south on Route 77 in Portland. Continue on Broadway in South Portland. Turn right on Pickett Street and then left onto Fort Road, which ends at Fort Preble and a parking area.

(866) 570-5703
springpointledgelight@gmail.com

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Cuckolds Fog Signal & Light Station
Southport
A dramatic, offshore fog-signal station and lighthouse built on two rocky islets that rise about 15 feet above high water in the westerly edge of the channel at the entrance to Booth Bay. The station opened in 1892 as a fog signal station. In 1907, it grew to include a lighthouse. A recent community initiative rescued the old station. It has been rebuilt as an inn.

(855) 212-5252
keepers@innatcuckoldslighthouse.com

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Two Bush Island Light
Spruce Head
Two Bush Island Light was established in 1897 to mark a well-trafficked sea lane to Penobscot Bay. This lonely light was eventually automated. In 1970, the Coast Guard allowed the U.S. Army Special Forces to blow up the keeper's house as part of a demolition exercise. Only the square light tower remains. The light is not open to the public.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Tenants Harbor Lighthouse
St. George
Tenants Harbor Light was established in 1857 at the east end of Southern Island, marking the entrance to Tenants Harbor. The light is owned by Jamie Wyeth, Andrew's son. It is closed to the public. The pyramidal bell tower now is the artist's studio.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Whitehead Light
St. George
Whitehead Light was commissioned in 1803 and was the seventh lighthouse commissioned in the United States. It has been in continuous operation ever since. The station is now owned by Pine Island Camp, which has renovated the historic structures and uses them for educational programs. The U.S. Coast Guard maintains and operates the light.

(207) 200-7957
info@whiteheadlightstation.org

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Fort Point Light
Stockton Springs
Fort Point Lighthouse was built in 1836. It first guided boats bound for Bangor, which in the mid-19th century was a lumbering port. The light station includes a two-story keeper's house - attached to the light tower by a short, enclosed passageway - and a pyramidal bell tower. The station is located within Fort Port State Park, along with the remains of the old fort. The lighthouse is the residence of the park ranger. The grounds are open daily from 9 a.m. until sunset.

(207) 567-3356

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Mark Island Light (Deer Isle Thorofare Light)
Stonington
Built in 1857 and now owned by Island Heritage Trust. The grounds are open, the tower is closed. Can be viewed from the southern shore of Stonington on Sand Beach Road, by boat with Guided Island Tours, Isle au Haut Ferry Service, and Old Quarry Ocean Adventures or by air with Penobscot Island Air.

(207) 348-2455
deerisle@deerisle.com

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Burnt Coat Harbor Lighthouse
Swans Island
Burnt Coat Harbor Lighthouse was built in 1872. The light sits atop a promontory marking the entrance to Burnt Coat Harbor, the island's main port. The town is restoring the light, a tapering brick rectangle. The light is at the end of Lighthouse Road. Swan's Island can be reached by ferry from Bass Harbor on Mt. Desert Island. Tours offer views from the water.

(207) 526-4279
swanisle@tdstelme.net

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Browns Head Light
Vinalhaven
The Browns Head Light was built in 1832 on the offshore island of Vinalhaven. The light marks a popular seaway between Vinalhaven and North Haven islands. The lighthouse, at the end of Brown's Head Light Road, is closed to the public but the grounds are open. The lighthouse is rented to Vinalhaven's town manager. The Maine State Ferry Service offers daily, year-round transportation to Vinalhaven Island from the Maine State Ferry System terminal in Rockland.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Heron Neck Light Station
Vinalhaven
Heron Neck Light Station, set atop a bold, rocky cliff on Green Island, was established in 1854. This white and red-topped light marks the entrance to Hurricane Sound and guides mariners to Carver's Harbor, a busy seaport on Vinalhaven Island. The lighthouse is not open to the public.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Saddleback Ledge Light Station
Vinalhaven
Saddleback Ledge Light Station was established in 1839 on a barren, quarter-acre rock heap between Isle au Haut and Vinalhaven. Storms continually scoured the island, which could make it a miserable and even treacherous place for lightkeepers and their families. In 1954, the stout, granite tower was automated. Old Quarry Ocean Adventures offers a lighthouse boat trip that includes this light or you can arrange your own excursion with Guided Island Tours.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Hendricks Head Light Station
West Southport
Hendricks Head Light Station was established on a promontory at the mouth of the Sheepscot River in 1829. A newer, rectangular brick tower was built in 1875. The station is privately owned and an active aid to navigation. You can see it from the end of Beach Road in West Southport or by boat tour.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Egg Rock Light Station
Winter Harbor
This squat, square light station was built on a tiny, off-shore island in 1875. The light, now automated, is overseen by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It is closed to the public and is best seen by boat. It can also be viewed from the Schooner Head parking lot, which is off Park Loop Road in the Bar Harbor section of Acadia National Park.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Winter Harbor Light
Winter Harbor
Winter Harbor was long a favorite safe harbor for mariners seeking shelter from storms. In 1856, a lighthouse was built on four-acre Mark Island to guide vessels into the harbor and to warn of dangerous ledges nearby. The lighthouse went into service on Jan. 1, 1857, and was decommissioned in 1933. It is now privately owned. You can best see this lighthouse by boat. You can also see it distantly from the roadside on the Schoodic Peninsula.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Boon Island Lighthouse
York
Tiny Boon Island is about nine miles off the coast of York. From colonial times, the low-lying island was a hazard to ships. The current granite and brick tower, built in 1855, is 133 feet tall. The tower is 25 feet in diameter at the base and 12 feet at the top. It is the tallest light tower in New England from base to tip. It is not open to the public but can be seen from Sohier Park, off Nubble Road, in York Beach and as part of local lighthouse cruises.

(207) 594-3301
info@MaineLighthouseMuseum.com

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Cape Neddick “Nubble” Lighthouse
York
Cape Neddick Lighthouse, often called "Nubble Light," was completed in 1879. The picturesque and often-photographed lighthouse features a charming, Victorian keeper's house with gingerbread trim and a lantern with miniature cast-iron lighthouses on its railing. When NASA officials picked photos for the Voyager spacecraft - photos intended to identify Earth if the craft fell into extraterrestrial hands - they included a photo of the Nubble. The station sits on a tiny island just off-shore at York. The island and light station are off-limits to the public, except during occasional tours by Friends of Nubble Light. But the light can be seen easily from the mainland at York's Sohier Park.

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"We have been fortunate to have made two movies in Maine — The Way We Get By and Beneath The Harvest Sky.” Maine is a very special state in that there are so many options for locations. Given its size, you can travel to northern Maine, southern Maine, all along the coast, and tell a number of different stories in totally unique worlds with each film having very distinctive looks. The abundance of locations combined with the incredible generosity of the people and communities, make filmmaking in Maine a pure joy. We would not be filmmakers today without the support from the people of Maine and we will be forever grateful."

- Gita Pullapilly and Aron Gaudet, The Way We Get By and Beneath the Harvest Sky

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"Hands down, Karen Carberry Warhola in the Maine Film Office was the most supportive person I’ve ever spoken with, with any film project I’ve ever worked on."

- Scotty Crowe, Astraea, 2015

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PHONE  207-624-9828

EMAIL  film@maine.gov

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